Gourmet


more topics...


SOUTH AFRICAN CUISINE

SOUTH AFRICA - 30.03.2021

TG Magazine - the South African Cuisine
Photo by Unsplash

 

South African cuisine - the fabulous result of the meeting of many diverse and remote cultures, brought together in their extravagant flavours, exclusive on TG Magazine. 

 

"An exquisite and intense journey to the senses" This time we will talk about one of the richest and most fascinating cuisines in the world: South African Gastronomy, colourful and multicultural, spectacular for its variety in the mixture of intense flavours and representative of the confluence of navigators and explorers who travelled the ends of the planet. 

South African cuisine - the fabulous result of the fusion of very diverse and remote cultures, here converge in their extravagant flavours, the exquisite culinary traditions of multiple African tribes, the intensity of the spices of distant Indonesia and mystical India, the delicious sweet and sour tones of Malaysia and ancient China, the intense spiciness traded by Portuguese sailors, and a variety of European recipes, as well as the elaboration of pleasant wines and unforgettable and original liquors.

 

A real gourmet trip, where you should taste the "Boerewors", sausages made from a mixture of beef, pork and lamb, seasoned with vinegar, a touch of salt, and spices such as black pepper, cloves, nutmeg, coriander and chili. Indulge in "Amadumbe" a fusion mashed sweet potato mashed with butter and sprinkled with peanuts and drizzled with honey, or a Malaysian meat pie "Bobotie", cooked with egg and accompanied by yellow rice, coconut flavouring, fried sliced banana and extravagant spices. 

 

The "Frikadelle" a version of exquisite meatballs made with beef, pork, lamb or fish mixed with intense notes of Asian spices, or the mouth-watering "Vetkoek" pasties made with fried dough filled with minced meat or in some cases jam, honey or syrup. The "Poetoepap o Pap" side dish made from a soft and delicious white corn paste or the "Sosaties" consisting of lamb skewers, marinated with fried onions, garlic, chillies, tamarind juice and curry. The table should not be missed to indulge in a tasting of the extraordinary "South African Wines" and to taste their authentic liquors such as "Amarula". / Text Red.

“Sosaties” que consisten pinchos de carne de cordero, marinados con cebollas fritas, ajo, chiles, jugo de tamarindo y curry.
Foto: Mantra Media by Unsplash

HEALTHY SPRING FEELINGS

INTERNATIONAL - 20.03.2021

Photos: Collage by Unsplash

 

Spring is coming and so is the appetite for fresh, light and easy-to-prepare foods. It is interesting to note the offers on soft drinks, sugary desserts, cold creams and soups, ready meals...
Photo: Karl Fredrickson by Unsplash

Spring is coming and so is the appetite for fresh, light and easy-to-prepare foods. It is interesting to note the offers on soft drinks, sugary desserts, cold creams and soups, ready meals... but not all of them are healthy, and they are always much more expensive than if you make them at home - and certainly less tasty.

They also leave less room for imagination: as they come ready-made, you settle for the varieties sold instead of using things you already have at home to make variations with different flavours, colours and textures.

 

SPRING COOKING IDEAS

What fresh things can we make that are healthier, fresh, simple and, if possible, without roasting in the kitchen?

 

VEGETABLE PÂTÉS

Hummus, Guacamole, Babaganoush... all these are sold, of course, but you can make much more at home, to your taste, with dozens of different flavours, using leftovers you have in the fridge, adding your favourite ingredients and saving money.

 

For example, you can combine the hummus ingredients with roasted peppers, or a handful of walnuts, half a cucumber, unsweetened soya yoghurt, dried tomatoes, pickled beetroot, homemade sprouts... and with the same recipe make 4 or 5 different hummus, store them in small containers and have them whenever you want, whether to eat at home or on the go. Make the most of mushrooms, courgettes, aubergines and other seasonal vegetables. Change legumes: use lentils or cooked beans instead of chickpeas. Add fresh herbs: basil, mint, dill, chives. Combine them with other dishes that you can leave ready-made: ratatouille, piperade, roasted vegetable salads, falafel, vegan meatballs, seitan, marinated tofu.

 

SOUPS AND COLD CREAMS

These are the simplest and we all know them: gazpacho, salmorejo, ajo blanco, cucumber soup. Use gazpacho both as a refreshing drink and as an accompaniment to meals. Salmorejo can be used as a snack and as an accompaniment to any meal. You can use it perfectly as a salad dressing. The white garlic, made a little thicker, is great on sandwiches and sandwiches. It can be used as a base for gazpacho and salmorejo to make similar preparations but with other ingredients. For example, salmorejo with red peppers and gazpacho with beetroot and carrots. Don't be afraid to innovate, use the most daring and freshest ingredients.

  

VEGETABLE SPAGHETTI

Use a spiraliser or julienne cutter to make a plate of spaghetti or zoodles of courgette, cucumber or carrot (or all three) in a jiffy. Dress it like a salad or add sauce like pasta. Or all at once. Add cooked and cold vegetables, pickles, salmorejo as a sauce, fresh herbs, nuts, sprouts and whatever else takes your fancy. Although they sell vegetables already cut in this way, it is much cheaper to do it yourself with a spiraliser than to use packaged ones.

 

FLAVOURED WATERS

One of the things I like most about flavoured waters is to leave the fruit and eat it at the end. The best way to flavour water is to use fresh herbs and herbs. For example peach and mint, lemon, watermelon and mint, cherries and mint, etc. To get the full flavour of the water you have to leave it in the fridge for at least a day. Make a good quantity, at least 1.5 litres, and you will have enough to drink all day long. And to eat, of course.

 

FRUIT SHAKES AND SMOOTHIES

The first summer I spent as a vegan, many years ago now, I did it with fruit smoothies. There were no veggie drinks in any supermarket or anything like that, so as I didn't like coffee I just switched to fruit smoothies for breakfast. Buy all kinds of fruit, even if you don't like them, because the best thing to do is to mix them and drink them all together cool. At home, wash the fruit, peel the ones you can't eat with the skin on (e.g. bananas), cut them into medium-sized pieces and freeze them.

When you want a smoothie, take a handful of each fruit and blend it in a blender with water. You can measure the amounts with the glass you are going to use to drink it.

 

To make a smoothie add some fresh, non-frozen fruit and vegetable drink instead of water. You can also add unsweetened soy yoghurt to take your green smoothies to the next level. Fruit smoothies are super sweet if the fruit you use is at the perfect stage of ripeness. You can also add some vegetables such as carrots and tomatoes, which go well with any fruit. Try for example peach with carrots, it's delicious!  We hope this article has given you some new ideas for a healthy summer**. Text / Red.

 

** All product recommendations are subject to availability and possible allergies to substances, fruits or vegetables.

TGM Online Magazine - Business and Lifestyle
Photo: Brooke Lark by Unsplash

Guest Writer: Carlo Julian Pascu

Travel Gourmet Magazine, Online about Lifestyle and Business: Trend? Fashion? Deal? It is time to analyse where the G&T goes. It was born as a simple glass with gin, ice, tonic and citrus and has become a whole structured universe of tastes.
Photo Courtesy of Carlo Lulian Pascu ©

About

Carlo Lulian Pascu 

Mixologist & Brand Developing Executive at Franklin&Sons Ltd

 

Graduated in Hospitality and F&B Management, after obtaining  relevant international work experiences in the Luxury hospitality as Beverage and Bar Manager. 

 

Passionate about optimizing business models, whether it means simply changing their concept or rethinking them completely, to reach the full potential of growth and profit of a company or brand.

 


HERBS IN COCKTAILS

SPAIN - Reedited 2020-12-01 SPONSORED CONTENT Guest Writer Carlo Iulian Pascu

There a few simple ways you can use herbs in your cocktails also at Home for your private events and in Order to help you I will like to recommend the book  ‘’The Flavour Thesaurus’’ or please follow my next articles in order to discover how to pair herbs
Photo Courtesy of Franklin&Sons Ltd.

Whether it’s crafting a toddy with fresh ginger or creating your own basil simple syrup, more and more bar programs are incorporating herbs and spices into their cocktails.

 

Using the products already available in your kitchen not only encourages creativity, but it’s also a cost-saving move that strengthens the partnership between your back and front of house.

There a few simple ways you can use herbs in your cocktails also at Home for your private events and in Order to help you I will like to recommend the book  ‘’The Flavour Thesaurus’’ or please follow my next articles in order to discover how to pair herbs with your spirits.

There a few simple ways you can use herbs in your cocktails also at Home for your private events and in Order to help you I will like to recommend the book  ‘’The Flavour Thesaurus’’ or please follow my next articles in order to discover how to pair herbs
Photo Courtesy of Franklin&Sons Ltd.

Garnish is not just for the plate

The most common way to incorporate food items into cocktails is using herbs for garnish. Remember, even if a specific herb isn’t in the drink itself, that doesn’t mean that you can’t use it. A simple herb sprig can tease the nose and boost the aroma of a drink. An easy way to save money on herbs is to build your own in-house garden. By limiting your staff to using what is grown in your garden, you push them to think creatively about their drinks. It also encourages your bartenders to create beverages that complement your food menu.

The most common way to incorporate food items into cocktails is using herbs for garnish. Remember, even if a specific herb isn’t in the drink itself, that doesn’t mean that you can’t use it. A simple herb sprig can tease the nose and boost the aroma of a
Photo Courtesy of Franklin&Sons Ltd.

Muddle, but use caution!

If you’re not using herbs to garnish, you’re probably muddling them while crafting a cocktail. But, you can have too much of a good thing. Carefully tap the herb with the muddler just enough to release the oils from the leaves, not crush it to pieces. Too much pressure can make an herb taste earthy and lose its delicate flavours and aromas. Also make sure you’re using the correct glassware you don’t break the glass in the process.

Passionate about optimizing business models, whether it means simply changing their concept or rethinking them completely, to reach the full potential of growth and profit of a company or brand.

About

Carlo Lulian Pascu 

Mixologist & Brand Developing Executive at Franklin&Sons Ltd

 

Graduated in Hospitality and F&B Management, after obtaining  relevant international work experiences in the Luxury hospitality as Beverage and Bar Manager. Passionate about optimizing business models, whether it means simply changing their concept or rethinking them completely, to reach the full potential of growth and profit of a company or brand.

Photo Courtesy of Carlo Lulian Pascu ©

 

THE GIN &TONIC TRENDS

SPAIN - Reedited 2020-12-01 SPONSORED CONTENT Guest Writer Carlo Iulian Pascu

Trend? Fashion? Deal? It is time to analyse where the G&T goes. It was born as a simple glass with gin, ice, tonic and citrus and has become a whole structured universe of tastes. But sometimes the marketing & packaging leaves in the background aspects as relevant as the quality.

 

A few years ago G&T was just a drink served in a Tube Glass with a single ice, today, thanks to the natural evolution of the market and the marketing strategies, this drink has become one of the most requested drinks. My intention is not to focus on the service, much less on the fantastic liturgy that accompanies  it that, incidentally, has helped a greater number of audiences to get closer to bars that previously would not have entered. What I want is to focus on the negative effect of that boom. In my opinion, G&T has gotten out of hand. There are too many brands of Gins without substance. To finish, I want to say that, although there are realities that I do not like in this market, I wish long life to the G&T, to its liturgy of service.

 

Travel Gourmet Magazine, Online about Lifestyle and Business: Trend? Fashion? Deal? It is time to analyse where the G&T goes. It was born as a simple glass with gin, ice, tonic and citrus and has become a whole structured universe of tastes.
Photo Courtesy of Franklin&Sons Ltd.

THE HISTORY BEHIND THE EXCLUSIVE TASTE OF BRANDY

SPAIN - 2020-12-01 SPONSORED CONTENT Guest Writer Carlo Iulian Pascu

Brandy is produced in many countries, with very different characteristics. In order to be marketed, the Brandis must be aged in oak barrels for years prescribed by the laws of each country winemaker but today we want to talk about the Spanish Brandy as af
Photo: Courtesy of Spanish Oak Brandy

 

English word of Dutch origin, "Brandewijn" meaning burnt wine and used to refer to distillates (Brandy) of grape-like Cognac. The name brandy applies to all grape distillate produced outside the Department of Charente, France.

 

Brandy is produced in many countries, with very different characteristics. In order to be marketed, the Brandis must be aged in oak barrels for years prescribed by the laws of each country winemaker but today we want to talk about the Spanish Brandy as after French Cognac is one of the most exported in the World.

 

Most Spanish Brandy should be called Brandy de Jerez because they are distilled and sold by the Bodegas that make sherry. Brandy making in Spain goes back to the early Middle Ages when the Moors occupied southern Spain and Jerez. As its full name “de la Fontera” suggests, it was on the frontier between Christendom and the then more civilised Moorish Kingdom of Granada.

 

The Brandy making tradition disappeared until the arrival of the Dutch, in the late 17th century, came looking for brandy for their sailors as they had earlier in Cognac. The locals then developed what they called "Holandas", still the name used in Jerez for brandy, distilled to the same 70 per cent alcohol as cognac. Today, Spain produces about 80 million bottles of brandy. Three-quarters is consumed domestically, the balance is exported around the world. Mexico and the Philippines are the largest foreign consumers of Spanish brandy. 

 

Spanish brandy is primarily produced in Jerez, Cordoba (Montilla Moriles) in Andalucia (95%),  and Penedés in Catalonia (5%).  Spanish Classic brandy is mostly based on the Airén grape; a variety that can tolerate heat and drought. It is mostly grown for brandy production in La Mancha and Valdapeñas in central Spain. Palomino, a grape variety used in sherry production, is also used for producing Spanish brandy. In Penedés brandy producers use Macabeo, Xarel-lo and Parellada, the same grape varieties used to produce Spanish Cava. They also use Ugni blanc, the same grape variety used in Cognac. In Montilla Moriles The typical wines of this area are made with different varieties of white grape. They undergo aging under a flower veil by the Criaderas & Soleras system. We can find, according to its maturation, young, fine, amontillado and fragrant wine. These wines darken their tones, turning into generous wines, until they reach a maximum alcohol content of around 20º.

 

In addition, the sweet wine called Pedro Ximénez, made with this grape variety, originates from the Montilla - Moriles framework. Its consumption is becoming increasingly popular, largely due to its unique characteristics. It is consumed as an accompaniment to desserts or as part of sweet recipes, in addition to being eaten in any other circumstance. The Brandie made in this area are much more aromatic and with sweet hints , which makes it much more appealing for the modern consumer & Mixologist. / Text Guest Writer: Carlo lulian Pascu

 

The Brandie made in this area are much more aromatic and with sweet hints , which makes it much more appealing for the modern consumer & Mixologist.
Photo: Courtesy of Spanish Oak Brandy / Sitelink: Spanish Oak Brandy

GOURMET & FOODIES WELCOME

SLOVAC REPUBLIC - 2019-12-01

Foto Visit Kosice
Foto Visit Kosice

Very often Gourmet-Travellers are looking and reaching just for a destination of well being and felling free ti dive into the local kitchen.

 

Kosice in the Slovak Republic is definitive one of this destinations where being yourself is possible as being a gourmet with general size budget. Should you find yourself in need of food and drink, do not be afraid – the city centre flourishes with dozens of restaurants, cafés and confectioneries, such as the oldest pub in Slovakia and the 5th oldest pub in Europe.

 

It is called “HOSTINEC” (meaning “pub” in Slovak) and it offers not only freshly brewed beers of its own making, but also traditional homemade meals. Café and restaurant Slávia next to it, on the other hand, transports you into Art Nouveau times when elegance and fine manners were a Must. / Text: Red.

LET'S MAKE A DRINK AT HOME

SPAIN - 2019-05-01 SPONSORED CONTENT Guest Writer Carlo Iulian Pascu

Maybe one of the most frequent question after office hours. Asked from London to Singapore and from New York to Sidney. Asked in English speaking countries as well as in none.  During decades this sentence expressed more than just drinking something, more than the need of relax or feeling good.

Travel Gourmet Magazine, Online about Lifestyle and Business: Trend? Fashion? Deal? It is time to analyse where the G&T goes. It was born as a simple glass with gin, ice, tonic and citrus and has become a whole structured universe of tastes.
Photo Courtesy of Franklin&Sons Ltd.

The social aspect and the opportunity of sharing some moments with people, maybe enjoying a good conversation or just talking about sport events or football results – all this includes the question for sharing a drink. The huge creativity and the endless offer of drinks and cocktails in Bars and Restaurants might be increasing each week, but there are classics all over the world, which will never be untrendy. 

 

 

Reason enough for TRAVEL GOURMET MAGAZINE to invite the Beverage Expert 

CARLO IULIAN PASCO to write about this global classic – let’s take a GIN & TONIC:

Travel Gourmet Magazine, Online about Lifestyle and Business: Trend? Fashion? Deal? It is time to analyse where the G&T goes. It was born as a simple glass with gin, ice, tonic and citrus and has become a whole structured universe of tastes.
Photo Courtesy of Franklin&Sons Ltd.

FLY & DINE FOR GOURMET TRAVELLERS

LITHUANIA - 2019-10-10 Guest Writer: Viktorija Samarinaite

Travel Gourmet Magazine -Publish your world to others - here and online on three independent editions.
Photo: hotairlines.lt ©
Travel Gourmet Magazine - Publish your world to others - here and online on three independent editions.
Photo: hotairlines.lt ©

Lithuania might be a country you have never heard of before, but it has plenty to offer for a long-term traveller and a weekend escapee. Instead of choosing a guided sightseeing tour, indulge into once-in-a-lifetime experience and board a hot air balloon to get 360-degrees views of every sight possible.

Baroque Old Town of Vilnius, charming castle of Trakai island, impassable woods of Labanoras, a dozen of lakes, small pretty villages and the untouched countryside will knockout even the hard-boiled travellers. While already in Lithuania, why to choose a sole experience if you can combine the best sightseeing and the finest dining into one? Having a professional balloon pilot and a devoted chef on board gives an opportunity to introduce locals and the visitors to the premium dining concept and new perspective of seeing places.

The only flying restaurant in the Baltic States offers to enjoy the complex sensations, to drink in the tranquillity of a hot air balloon flight, to have a glass of wine and to relish a gourmet three-course meal prepared by one of the greatest chefs in the country. Now is the best time to collect your prime memories. / Text: Viktorija Samarinaite

 

Travel Gourmet Magazine - Publish your world to others - here and online on three independent editions.
Photo: hotairlines.lt ©

JAPANS SUSHI UNIVERSITY FOR GOURMET TRAVELLERS

Sushi University in Japan, learning by travelling, travelling for learning
Photo: Courtesy of Tetsuya Hanada, Tabimori, Inc.

Learn & Dine during your stay

JAPAN - 2019-04-10

How would you like to sit at an authentic, Edo-style sushi counter, enjoying sophisticated conversation with the chef? Sushi University isn’t just eating delicious sushi. Each excursion includes a skilled interpreter who accompanies you from start to finish, allowing you to experience the culture and history of sushi as well as learn about seasonal toppings the chef’s specialties and style of the restaurant.

 

It is also a unique opportunity to ask any questions that come to mind during your experience, all in Tokyo, the birthplace of Edo-style sushi. If you’re coming all the way to Tokyo to eat sushi, take the time to sit at the counter and taste the work and tradition put into a single piece of sushi, making it an experience you will never forget.

Enjoy and learn about Sushi in the right place.
Photo: Courtesy of Tetsuya Hanada, Tabimori, Inc.

Cooked rice mixed with sushi-vinegar in which sugar and salt are added. In sushi term it is called “shari”. It is said that fish ingredient counts up 40% and shari is responsible for 60% to make tasty sushi. Bad-taste shari spoils entire sushi even if good fish ingredient is used. 

Enjoy and learn about Sushi in the right place.
Photo: Courtesy of Tetsuya Hanada, Tabimori, Inc.

"Nikir"I is a short form of "nikiri syouyu" in which an alcohol-evaporated "mirin", sake, soy sauce and "dashi" broth are added together. Since raw soy sauce is too strong a taste for sushi, brush sushi lightly with nikiri is tasty enough to eat. 

Courses

Enjoy and learn about Sushi in the right place.
Photo: Courtesy of Tetsuya Hanada, Tabimori, Inc.

The Sushi Chef will give you a lecture in Japanese language as if he/she is speaking to Japanese customer. There will be an interpreter to translate sushi chef’s lecture into English. There are three courses which are basic, intermediate and advanced.

 

In basic course, the lectures will be conducted at a sushi bar where office workers might want to drop by to grab a sushi dinner after work. Intermediate course, the lectures will be at sushi place where customers might want to celebrate important anniversaries. At advanced course, the lectures will be held at a sushi restaurant where you would like to taste high quality sushi with domestic, natural ingredients regardless of the price. 

Facts about...

Tabimori, Inc. is committed to assist travellers from all around the world to provide attractive and latest information for tourists.

By removing language barrier, traveler’s concerns will disappear and information will become more interesting when it was written in mother language. In order to meet those needs, we created a website in multiple languages that provide information of local food which is rather difficult to accurately translate with internet tool.

To start with, we launched a website (www.usefulmenu.com) which introduces well-established restaurants that the conventional guidebooks couldn’t cover. And another site (sushiuniverity.jp) provides opportunities to learn history and traditions of Edomae-style sushi while eating great sushi dish. The both sites have been well received so far as useful and attractive information. This is the first step for us toward becoming more useful source of information for travellers.